Category Archives: Installation

Aug
2

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The Unparalleled Power of the ClearStream 2V HDTV Antenna

Over the last 10 years, we have completely transformed the way people think about television antennas. The days of the tin foil rabbit ears and behemoth-size roof antennas are long gone. Because the beamwidth and gain of our HDTV antennas are so much greater, they can be installed in a variety of different places in the home.

Recently, we received a wonderful email regarding our ClearStream 2V outdoor antenna and its unparalleled power. After a year of using a Radio Shack antenna, the Cincinnati resident decided it was time for something a little more powerful.

While the roof might be one of the more common spots to mount one of our outdoor antennas, you can—depending on the environment—install it either indoors or right outside a window.
As you can see, he installed the antenna on the patio rail of his condo.

ClearStream2 HDTV Antenna

It actually points at an adjacent building, but he still receives crystal clear reception! Also, the ClearStream 2V pulls in an additional 20 channels, making his viewing experience all the merrier!

ClearStream2 HDTV

Big thanks to Mike Kelley for sharing these great pictures with us! We are so happy that you love your antenna!

Looking to upgrade your current television antenna? We are here to help! At Antennas Direct, we carry a wide variety of both indoor and outdoor HDTV antennas. To find out which one is right for you, head on over to antennapoint.com!

Jan
10

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ClearStream 5 Antenna Tested and Approved by TV Technology

An editor of TV Technology, James E. O’Neal describes a story that is similar to many of our customers. He was looking for a high power, easy to assemble antenna that would provide clear reception for channels that broadcast in high VHF that may be more than 65+ miles away.

Our ClearStream 5 High Gain VHF Antenna was up to O’Neal’s challenge in his country home outside of Washington DC. Here is how he describes his experience from the antenna installation to performance:

The C5 consists of two pieces—a more or less rectangular “loop” with a small box at the bottom sporting an output connector. The other member is similar to the “loop” but is in the form of a sideways “H” affixed to a mesh element that is obviously a reflector, but one that seems more in keeping with what you’d find on a UHF bowtie rig. The hardware supplied consisted of screws, washers, spacers, and U-bolts for mast mounting. There was also a V/U combiner (diplexer) in a nice weatherproof enclosure.

IN USE

ClearStream 5 Featured on TV Technology

I parked it on the den floor, and with just a little tweaking and shimming, the game reappeared—solid as a rock. The height AGL was now only about three feet. This is one remarkable antenna.

Rather than retreat to the attic, I left the unit on the floor and viewed the remainder of the game. When it ended (my college team won), I uncabled things and journeyed to the attic hatchway. On a hunch, I elected not to take the C5 apart, and found that it easily fit through the 23×29-inch hatch opening.

The C5 is now mounted alongside my bow-tie array and performs very nicely.

Read the full article about the ClearStream 5 from TVTechnology.com.
Thanks for the glowing review Mr. O’Neal. We hope you enjoy the C5 and those VHF channels for years to come.
Dec
16

Posted in Antennas Direct, Ask the Expert, Installation | Comments

Using Existing Cable Units for Your OTA Television Antenna

I have the same situation as with Helena. Mom of four boys and just tried to make ends meet got rid of cable expense. Interested in the DB2 with the J post to be located in the attic. My house was pre-wired so cable company just came in and connected service. Now that my service is gone…can I use that same box on the side of my house where they hooked up their cable and connect it to the DB2 up in the attic? There are 8 cable outlets in the house…would it still work and what kind of amplifier should I use? From Mariel in Richmond, VA

Hi Mariel,

Since it sounds like you already have coaxial cable running through the house it might be worth it to see if there is or is not a single network of coax inside the house. If it is not a single network, you may not receive reception on all of your TVs.

Also, when using the leftover cables you must ensure all of the distribution items installed by the Dish company are removed such as splitters and diplexers because they could interfere with your reception.

Amplifiers are sometimes necessary to overcome signal loss related to splitters and junctions. Remember that an amplifier does not create a signal. It will only enhance a signal that is already there, but may be weak when split to different televisions. Here are some previous blog posts that might help.

Do I Need an Antenna Amplifier with my Antenna?

What is the Difference Between an A Distribution Amplifier and a Preamplifier?

How to Cut, Strip and Terminate Coaxial Cable

Nov
12

Posted in Antennas Direct, Installation | Comments

Antennas Direct’s DB4 in Action

Today a fan on our facebook page posted a video showing just how easy it was install a DB4 antenna and test it. Notice how they make good use of the satellite dish!

* Range: Up to 55 miles
* Strong performance across UHF spectrum (Channels 14-69)
* Versatile high gain multi – bay antenna
* Efficient design allows tremendous gain in a compact size 13.7 dBi gain
* Versatile HD antenna, succeeds in difficultareas where other antennas fail
* All weather Balun included
* Designed to resist extreme wind loading
* Works great in attics. Fits easily & high gain can help overcome loss from roofing materials
* Dimensions 29″ H x 19″ W x 4″ Deep
* Product Weight: 4.5 pounds

Oct
5

Posted in Ask the Expert, Installation | Comments Off

ClearStream5 – Cable and Placement

What type of cable is appropriate for the Clearstream5 antenna, and which direction should it face – the instructions don’t seem to cover these details.  – From Christopher in Palos Verdes Estates, California

Hi Christopher,

Any coaxial cable will work with your antenna. The type of cable depends more on the length of cable you need to run the antenna to your television. We have 3 types of coaxial cables available on our website, each in 50’ and 100’ measurements. We would recommend using any coaxial cable RG6 grade or better because it has a lower loss per foot so we find it works the best.

As for placement, it depends on where exactly you live. http://www.antennapoint.com will help you determine where to point your antenna by locating your transmitters.

The side with the cable attachment should face the transmitting stations. The metal grid is a reflector that bounces the signals back to the antenna.

Clearstream5 Antenna

Clearstream5 Antenna

Hope that answers your question. Let us know if you need more info. Thanks!

Sep
28

Posted in Ask the Expert, Installation | Comments Off

Setting Up an Antenna and Accessories

I am a single mom and recently cut out cable and internet to save money. My kids are going crazy. I thought that I could alleviate their boredom problem by ordering an antenna. I have two relatively new televisions, one upstairs and one downstairs. Since I am not extremely handy, and there is so much information, I just need to know what to buy. Do I need cables or anything other than the antenna. Ideally it would work best in the attic, but I have no problem putting it on a table next to my bedroom TV. I have added the following item to my shopping cart at amazon.com “Multi Directional HDTV Antenna” Manufactured by: ANTENNAS DIRECT, Model:DB2 . What else do i need? - From Helena in Harrisburg, North Carolina

Hi Helena,

Many of our customers have cut their cable cord and high monthly payments by getting a high quality antenna and enjoying free over-the-air TV.  You still get to watch great network television shows with clear reception, so I think you and your boys will be fine as long as you can get an antenna that will pick up those digital signals.

Antenna
When you are choosing an antenna one of the most important things to consider is your location and how far you are from the broadcast towers. To get started we recommend going to www.antennapoint.com. This will find your nearest digital TV transmitters.

DB2 Multidirectional Antenna

DB2 Multidirectional Antenna

The DB2 is a multi-directional antenna so it is ideal for locations where the transmitting towers are not centrallylocated or when you are trying to catch signals from multiple cities. This antenna can be used inside, outside or in the attic, but it will probably perform best outside on your roof or second best in your attic.

Coaxial Cable
You will need a coaxial cable that connects your digital tuner (most likely located in the television for newer tvs) to your antenna. Never run the cable through a window or door. It’s best to go through the attic.

Antenna Mount
For the best performance in your attic we would recommend using antenna mount and don’t let the antenna touch the attic floor.

Splitter
Where ever you decide to place your antenna you can use a 2 way splitter to receive reception for both of your TVs from the same antenna. You will need 2 coaxial cables – one for each television.  However you should note that using any splitter in your system will degrade your signal greatly. If you find that signal degradation occurs once a splitter is installed you should instead use a distribution amplifier to attach multiple television to your antenna.

Hope this information helps you. Let us know how it goes!

Sep
14

Posted in Ask the Expert, Installation | Comments Off

How to Ground an Outdoor Antenna

What is the best way to ground my Clearstream4 antenna? Should I use coax cable with an integrated separate ground wire, or run a separate wire? If so, what gage wire should I use? (I’m setting it on a tripod mount I purchased from you). Thanks! - From Steve in Fort Collins, Colorado

Hi Steve,

Grounding the coax cable with a coaxial lighting surge protector will protect your equipment from voltage surges created by nearby strikes but not from a direct strike. To protect yourself from a direct strike, attach a lightening arrester to the antenna mast. Connect #8 gauge wire to a copper clad ground rod driving it at least 4 feet into the ground.

We would also recommend checking your local electrical codes to make sure you are in compliance or even look into having a professional electrician advise and/or install for you. View this list of recommended antenna installers.

Antennas Direct accepts no responsibility for damage from improper grounding.

Jul
6

Posted in Antennas Direct, Ask the Expert, Installation | Comments Off

Still Getting Used to the Digital Transition

Question: If I have old TVs do I need some sort of converter box and an antenna? From Cheryl in Coppell, Texas

Answer:

Hi Cheryl,

You do need a converter box to receive the digital signals that replaced analog in 2009. You need this in order to convert the new digital signals to analog signals that your older television can read. Converter boxes usually run about $40-$70.

Your other option is to buy a newer television that has a digital tuner already build in. All new televisions made after 2007should have these included. You will not need a converter box with these TVs.

Keep in mind that if you get a converter box or if you opt to buy a new TV you will still need an antenna in order to receive free over-the-air television. We would recommend trying to get a signal with your old antenna. If you are finding that you cannot pick up a signal, it might be time to upgrade your antenna first. To find digital transmitters nearest to your home visit www.antennapoint.com.

Hope this helps and let us know if you need antenna recommendations! Thanks

Jun
17

Posted in Antennas Direct, Ask the Expert, Installation | Comments Off

Can I Use My Old Dish Pole to Mount My Antenna?

Question: I understand it is best to mount antenna on roof, not in attic. I have a old dish out side and I was wondering if I could mount my antenna on that pole. It is about 5′ tall? And use the cables that are all ready installed? From Cindy in Wilson, North Carolina

Answer:

Hi Cindy,

You are correct. If it is possible, we usually always recommend mounting an antenna on the roof rather than the attic. This way there is less of a chance of interference and your antenna will be higher on the roof.

Using the leftover dish mount is sometimes a great solution to your antenna mounting needs. There are however a couple of variables to check before doing so.

  1. When using the mount will your roof or other objects such as trees impede the clear line of sight needed by your antenna for consistent reception.
  2. Also when using the leftover cables you must ensure all of the distribution items installed by the Dish company are removed such as splitters and diplexers because they could interfere with your reception.
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